Shannen's Dream - Timeline and Documents

ENGLISH TEXT

  • 1995

    More environmental investigations are conducted finding the school to be contaminated with toxins harmful to human exposure. The school property is rated as a “Level 1, High Sensitive Site.”

  • 1990s

    Attawapiskat children and teachers continue to suffer illness from exposure to carcinogen-laden fumes.

  • 1984

    INAC (Indian and Northern Affairs Canada) hires consultants to investigate and clean up measures are recommended. No subsequent action is taken.

  • 1982

    Evidence of oil in school foundation and petroleum odour in classrooms.

  • 1982

    The Charter of Rights and Freedoms (The Constitution Act, 1982) is signed. From the Section 35 of the Charter: “(1) The existing aboriginal and treaty rights of the aboriginal peoples of Canada are hereby recognized and affirmed. (2) In this Act, ‘aboriginal peoples of Canada’ includes the Indian, Inuit, and Metis peoples of Canada.” Read the Canadian Charter of Rights and Freedoms, 1982.

  • 1980s

    Children of Attawapiskat and teachers get sick from exposure to carcinogen-laden fumes.

  • 1979

    25 000 Gallons of oil leaks into the soil near the school.

  • 1976

    R Nakogee School is built in Attawapiskat First Nation.

  • 1972

    The Government of Canada begins to phase out Residential Schools.

  • 1967

    The Education of Indians in Ontario: A Report to the Provincial Committee on Aims and Objectives of Education in the Schools of Ontario is published. From the report: “Knowing how much lag can be expected between the formulation of new policies, including the staging of exciting new pilot projects and the general adoption of these principles into the whole system, a key question immediately comes to mind. Taking into account the Indian question in this province, can Ontario afford to wait for this type of glacial change? School board, outlook, supervision, teacher training, textbooks must all be modified. Let someone hazard a guess as to what year or what century significant changes toward real equality will be noted in the achievement of the children,” (Sim, 1967, p. 35).

     

    The Education of Indians in Ontario (Author: R. Alex Sim)

  • 1960

    First Nations people living on reserve are able to vote in federal elections.

  • June 27, 1921

    Treaty No. 11 is signed, noting in the agreement that First Nations children signed under the Treaty will receive education paid for by the Government of Canada. Read Treaty No. 11.

  • January 1907

    Treaty No. 10 is signed. The preamble to the Treaty states, “As to education, the Indians were assured that there was no need for special stipulation over and above the general provision in the treaty, as it was the policy of the government to provide in every part of the country as far as circumstances would permit, for the education of the Indian children…” Read Treaty No. 10.

  • July - August 1905

    Treaty No. 9 – The James Bay Treaty is signed, guaranteeing educational provisions: “His Majesty agrees to pay such salaries of teachers to instruct the children of said Indians, and also to provide such school buildings and educational equipment as may seem advisable to His Majesty's government of Canada.” Read Treaty No. 9.

  • June - July 1899

    Treaty No. 8 is signed, noting in the agreement that First Nations children signed under the Treaty will receive education paid for by the Government of Canada. Read Treaty No. 8.

  • September 22 & December 4, 1877

    Treaty No. 7 is signed, noting in the agreement that First Nations children signed under the Treaty will receive education paid for by the Government of Canada. Read Treaty No. 7.

  • April 12, 1876

    The Government of Canada enacts racist legislation, the Indian Act, 1876, aimed at controlling and assimilating the Indigenous population. One of the strategies of the Indian Act, 1876 was to “enfranchise” any First Nations person that obtained post-secondary education, forcing a choice between maintaining basic human rights, or Indigenous rights. While it has undergone many revisions, the Indian Act is still in place today and has not been updated since 1985. Read the Indian Act, 1876 and Indian Act, 1985.

  • August 23 & 28 and September 9, 1876

    Treaty No. 6 is signed. It is stated in the Treaty that, “Her Majesty agrees to maintain schools for instruction in such reserves hereby made as to Her Government of the Dominion of Canada may seem advisable, whenever the Indians of the reserve shall desire it.” Read Treaty No. 6.

  • September 20 & 24, 1875

    Treaty No. 5 is signed. It is stated in the Treaty that, “Her Majesty agrees to maintain schools for instruction in such reserves hereby made as to Her Government of the Dominion of Canada may seem advisable, whenever the Indians of the reserve shall desire it." Read Treaty No. 5.

  • July 20, 1874

    Treaty No. 4 is signed. It is stated in the Treaty that, “Her Majesty agrees to maintain a school in the reserve allotted to each band as soon as they settle on said reserve and are prepared for a teacher.” Read Treaty No. 4.

  • October, 1873

    Treaty No. 3 is signed. The government agrees to “maintain schools for instruction,” on reserves. Read Treaty No. 3.

  • August 21, 1871

    Treaty No. 2 is signed. “Her Majesty agrees to maintain a school on each reserve hereby made whenever the Indians of the reserve should desire it.” Read Treaty No. 2.

  • August 3, 1871

    Treaty No. 1 is signed. “Her Majesty agrees to maintain a school on each reserve hereby made whenever the Indians of the reserve should desire it.” Read Treaty No. 1.

  • 1870s-1990s

    The federal government forces First Nations, Métis, and Inuit children from their home and places them in Residential Schools operated by the church. Many children experience emotional, physical, and sexual abuse while attending the schools. The goal of residential schools was assimilation – punishing the expression of Aboriginal cultures and languages. Read more about the Residential School system.

  • June 22, 1869

    The Gradual Enfranchisement Act, 1869, removes Indian status from women who marry non-status First Nations. Children of that marriage were prevented by the government from obtaining that Indigenous status and rights. Read the Gradual Enfranchisement Act, 1869.

  • March 29, 1867

    The federal government enacts the Constitution Act, 1867 (previously known as the British North America Act), and officially takes control over “Indians and lands reserved for the Indians." Read the Constitution Act, 1867.

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