FNCARES - Events

FNCARES works with community partners to organize and host numerous public events each year, including lectures, panel discussions, webinars, film screenings, and book launches.

To receive notifications about upcoming events, email fncares@ualberta.ca.

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Upcoming Events

 

Mind Control and Colonization

December 8, 2021 – 1:00-2:30 ET/11:00-12:30 MT – Online

Speakers: Dr. Steven Hassan, Dr. Pam Palmater, and Dr. Cindy Blackstock

In this virtual talk, speakers will discuss what mind control is, how it perpetuates colonization in Canada, and how it influences the colonial agenda and colonial practices, at both individual and institutional levels. 

Register here: https://b.link/x8rnrv

 

Past Events

 

Bill C-92: The good, the Bad & the Unknowns - Part II

On April 22, 2021, FNCARES partnered with Wahkohtowin Law and Governance Lodge and the Faculties of Law and Native Studies at the University of Alberta on Part II of our series on Bill C-92: An Act Respecting First Nations, Inuit and Métis children, youth and families. Speakers Cindy Blackstock, Hadley Friedland, and Koren Lightning-Earle discussed emerging issues with Bill C-92 since it became law on January 1, 2020. Watch the presentation here: youtube.com/watch?v=NiVKyTB_c5U

 

(Dis)placed Film Screening and Learning Guide Launch

On November 24, 2020, FNCARES partnered with the Alberta College of Social Workers (ACSW) and the Canadian Association of Social Workers (CASW) for a webinar launch of our Learning Guide for Professionals Working with Indigenous Children and Youth. Anyone can register to watch the webinar (excluding the film) for free by clicking here. To preview and/or purchase the film, contact Vtape.

 

Alberta Virtual Film Premiere and Interview with Cindy Blackstock

On the evening of November 18, 2020, Cindy Blackstock joined Melisa Brittain in Kiwi Productions studios in Edmonton for an online even to launch Spirit Bear and Children Make History  to children and families across Alberta and Canada. After a screening of the film, Cindy answered questions submitted from viewers across the country. 

 

Virtual Film Launch in Schools across Canada

In partnership with the First Nations Child & Family Caring Society, we launched the film Spirit Bear and Children Make History in schools across Canada between November 16 and 27, 2020. Following the film screenings, teachers and students tuned into a livestream webinar featuring Cindy Blackstock and Spirit Bear, plus three special guests: Theland Kicknosway, who is the voice of Spirit Bear in the film, Raiyah Patel, a young person who has participated in teh Caring Society's campaigns for many years, and Danielle Fontaine, a retired teacher who attended the Canadian Human Rights Tribunal hearings on equity for First Nations children with her students. 

 

Film Screening and Panel Discussion: Jordan River Anderson, The Messenger

On March 8, 2020, FNCARES partnered with the Metro Cinema, the NFB and others to bring legendary Abenaki filmmaker Alanis Obomsawin to Edmonton to screen her most recent film, Jordan River Anderson, the Messenger (NFB, 2019). After the screening, Deanna Wolf Ear from the First Nations Health Consortium joined Alanis Obomsawin and Melisa Brittain on stage for an informative discussion with the audience about making the film and the implementation of Jordan's Principle in Alberta. Film's website: https://www.nfb.ca/film/jordan-river-anderson-the-messenger/

 

Bill C-92: The Good, the Bad and the Unknowns - Part I

On Wednesday, Nov. 6, 2019, FNCARES partnered with the Faculty of Law, Wahkohtowin Law and Governance Lodge, the Indigenous Law Students' Association and the Faculty of Native Studies at the University of Alberta for a talk on Bill C-92, An Act respecting First Nations, Inuit and Métis children, youth and families. Cindy Blackstock and Hadley Friedland discussed the bill’s unprecedented recognition of Indigenous People’s right to jurisdiction in relation to child and family services along with many concerns about the legislation. Watch the presentation here: youtube.com/watch?v=I7tMq0ta0D0

 

Teddy Bear Tea Party and Book Launch - Spirit Bear: Fishing for Knowledge, Catching Dreams

Thursday, June 13, 10-11:30 a.m., Zeidler Hall, Citadel Theatre, Edmonton, Alberta. Over 180 elementary students joined Cindy Blackstock, Spirit Bear and other special guests for a reading of Spirit Bear's second book and a performance by students from Elk Island Public Schools of "A Place Like This." Watch video of performance here.

 

Teaching Guide Launch and Film Screening - (Dis)placed: Indigenous Youth and the Child Welfare System

Wednesday, March 13, 2019, University of Alberta, Edmonton: FNCARES launched a teaching guide to accompany our film (Dis)placed: Indigenous Youth and the Child Welfare System. Hosted by the Office of the Dean, Faculty of Education, the event began with a screening of the film, followed by a short presentation by co-authors Sarah Auger (doctoral student in Educational Policy Studies, University of Alberta) and Melisa Brittain (FNCARES) and a Q&A with the audience. Learn more about the film here. Free access to Teaching Guide for Grades 9-12.

 

Film Screening (Dis)placed: Indigenous Youth and the Child Welfare System

Saturday, Nov. 17, 2018, 1:45 pm, River Park Church Auditorium, 3818-14A St., Calgary, AB. Entry is Free and venue is wheelchair accessible. For more information, visit Marda Loop Justice Film Festival.

 

Finding Peter Bryce: Story of a National Crime - Film screening & Panel Discussion

June 27, 2018, University of Alberta, Edmonton. Panelists Charlene Bearhead, Walter Brertton, and Dr. Jill Konkin discuss advocacy and resistance from within colonial systems.

 

Teddy Bear Tea Party and Book Launch in Edmonton - Spirit Bear and Children Make History

Feb. 5, 2018, Zeidler Hall, Citadel Theatre, Edmonton AB, 10-11:30 am. One hundred and fifty students from grades 2-5 joined Spirit Bear, Cindy Blackstock, and Mayor Don Iveson at the Western Canada launch of Spirit Bear's new book, where he tells his story of standing up for First Nations kids and how all children can make positive change. Written by Cindy Blackstock and Eddy Robinson, with illustrations by Amanda Strong. 

 

(Dis)placed: Indigenous Youth and the Child Welfare System - Film Screening & Panel Discussion

Oct. 26, 2017, University of Alberta, Edmonton: FNCARES hosted a screening of our film (Dis)Placed: Indigenous Youth and the Child Welfare System followed by a spoken word performance by Donovan Waskahat and a panel discussion with Jesse Downing, Donovan Waskahat, Derek Chewka, and Melisa Brittain. Thanks to the Centre for Global Citizenship Education & Research at the University of Alberta for collaborating on the event and to moderator Angela Wolfe. 

 

Incremental Equality = Discrimination: First Nations and Public Services

September 14, 2017, University of Alberta: Free public lecture by Dr. Alika Lafontaine and Dr. Cindy Blackstock, who spoke about the problems with incremental equality in public services for First Nations children, families, and communities. Thanks to our partners: University of Alberta’s Faculty of Medicine & Dentistry and the Office of Safe Disclosure and Human Rights.  Click here to watch video of the lecture.

 

(Dis)placed: Indigenous Youth and the Child Welfare System  

Film screening followed by panel discussion with Mr. Rick Lightning, Jo-Mary Crowchild-Fletcher, and Derek Chewka, chaired by Amber Dion

March 23, 2017, MacEwan University, Edmonton: Canada’s colonial practice of forcibly removing Indigenous children from their families did not end with the closing of Indian residential schools. It continues today in the form of provincial and territorial child welfare systems, which remove Indigenous children and youth at alarmingly high rates. This film features the voices of Indigenous youth as they reflect on their prior involvement with child welfare and share their multiple strategies of resistance to assimilation and state control. Adding to these insights, First Nations child advocate Cindy Blackstock traces the term ‘neglect’, the main rationale for child welfare removals, to its roots in the residential school system, and points to laws that codify structural discrimination as the leading cause of child welfare (dis)placements. Presented by MacEwan University with FNCARES. Click here to learn more about the film.

 

We Can't Make the Same Mistake Twice 

Film screening followed by Q & A with Director Alanis Obomsawin and Cindy Blackstock. Feb. 12, 2017, Metro Cinema, Edmonton, AB 

In 2007, the First Nations Child and Family Caring Society of Canada and the Assembly of First Nations filed a landmark discrimination complaint against the Canadian government. They argued that child welfare services provided to First Nations children on reserves are underfunded and inferior to services offered to other Canadian children. Veteran director Alanis Obomsawin's most recent film, We Can't Make the Same Mistake Twice (dir. Alanis Obomsawin, 2 h 43 min) documents this epic court challenge as it is led by Cindy Blackstock, the tenacious child advocate at its epicentre. 

Watch Q & A session with Alanis Obomsawin and Cindy Blackstock

Watch Trailer

Co-Presented by Reconciliation in FocusMetro Cinema Society and First Nations Children's Action Research and Education Service (FNCARES)

Read the POV interview with Alanis Obomsawin about making the film.

 

Premiere Screenings of (Dis)placed: Indigenous Youth and the Child Welfare System 

Sunday, Nov. 13, 2016, 3:30pm, Metro Cinema at the Garneau Theatre,  Edmonton, AB and Sunday, Nov. 27, 2016, 4pm, Glenbow Museum Theatre, Calgary, AB

Canada’s colonial practice of forcibly removing Indigenous children from their families did not end with the closing of Indian residential schools. It continues today in the form of provincial and territorial child welfare systems, which remove Indigenous children and youth at alarmingly high rates. This film features the voices of Indigenous youth as they reflect on their prior involvement with child welfare and share their multiple strategies of resistance to assimilation and state control. Adding to these insights, First Nations child advocate Cindy Blackstock traces the term ‘neglect’, the main rationale for child welfare removals, to its roots in the residential school system, and points to laws that codify structural discrimination as the leading cause of child welfare (dis)placements. Panel discussion following the film featured Tia Ledesma, co-producer Daniela Navia, and Cindy Blackstock.

 

Public Lecture by Dr. Cindy Blackstock - The Canadian Human Rights Tribunal on First Nations child welfare

March 15, 2016, 8:30-10:00 a.m., 4th Floor Lounge, Education North Building, University of Alberta, Edmonton

 

In 2007, Dr. Cindy Blackstock and the Assembly of First Nations filed a complaint with the Canadian Human Rights Tribunal alleging that Canada discriminates against First Nations children on the basis of race and/or national or ethnic origin by providing inequitable and insufficient funding for child and family services on reserves. In January 2016, the Tribunal ruled in favour of the complainants, ordering the government to cease discriminatory practices against 163,000 affected children and take measures to redress and prevent further discrimination. In this talk, Dr. Blackstock will discuss the Tribunal's findings, the remedies ordered, and what this means for First Nations children's rights in Canada moving forward. Presented by FNCARES and Equity, Diversity and Inclusion Week, University of Alberta. Click here for more information about the Human Rights case.

 

FNCARES releases First Nations Child Poverty: A Literature Review and Analysis

December 7, 2015. This five-chapter literature review and analysis of existing research on First Nations child poverty by Melisa Brittain and Cindy Blackstock examines the historical and contemporary causes and effects of First Nations child poverty. The authors also evaluate existing poverty measures and outline existing and proposed interventions to address the continued impoverishment of First Nations communities and children. Read First Nations Child Poverty: A Literature Review and Analysis here

 

Link to publication: https://fncaringsociety.com/publications/first-nations-child-poverty-literature-review-and-analysis-2015

 

 

Reconciliation in Post-Secondary: Implementing the TRC Recommendations, Free Public Lecture at University of Alberta

 

 

October 14, 2015, University of Alberta, Edmonton: FNCARES, Indigenous Peoples Education and Alberta Network Environments for Aboriginal Health Research hosted a public talk on implementing the TRC’s Calls to Action in Post-Secondary education. Dr. Keavy Martin hosted a panel of three speakers: Charlene Bearhead from the National Centre for Truth and Reconciliation, Dr. Eber Hampton, Faculty of Education at the University of Alberta and Dr. Cindy Blackstock. Over 260 people attended, and over 40 people joined the live stream of the talk. Watch the video of the panel here: 

 

 

 

Reconciliation Means Not Saying Sorry Twice - Free Public Lecture by Dr. Cindy Blackstock

February 26, 2014, MacEwan University, Edmonton: The Faculty of Health and Community Studies welcomed Dr. Cindy Blackstock to speak about the ongoing inequities faced by First Nations children and the inspiring reconciliation work being led by children to address the problem and uplift the country at the same time.

 

Followed: Access to Info and Surveillance, Free Public Lecture, University of Alberta

November 25, 2014: Presented in collaboration with the Information Access and Protection of Privacy program (IAPP) at UAlberta’s Faculty of Extension, this talk featured Dr. Cindy Blackstock discussing the implications and impacts of having her privacy breached by Federal officials as she works towards ensuring equitable funding for First Nations children. Jill Clayton, Alberta’s Information and Privacy Commissioner, and Mary Marshall, lawyer and Health Information Law expert, joined Cindy as speakers and panel discussants. 

 

Hi-Ho Mistahey! in the schools

February 24 and 25, 2014: ​In collaboration with Project of Heart, FNCARES presented four screenings of Hi-Ho Mistahey! in Edmonton. This film features the story of Shannen Koostachin and the Shannen’s Dream Campaign for equitable education for First Nations children. Screenings will take place at Ben Calf Robe Elementary and Junior High School and Jasper Place High School. Watch Hi-Ho Mistahey! for free here.

 

Hi-Ho Mistahey! A public screening and discussion with film's Director, Alanis Obomsawin

February 25, 2014, University of Alberta. Watch Hi-Ho Mistahey! for free here.


 

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